True love romeo and juliet essay

Love, on the other hand, is a true, deep, mutual commitment and attachment.

True love romeo and juliet essay

True love romeo and juliet essay

But one has to explore what types of love this refers to. Romantic love is the most obvious; indeed this love is communicated between the two main characters throughout the majority of the play. It is, to be cliched, love at first sight.

This does seem to be rather exaggerated and conflicts with how Romeo was earlier describing Rosaline: Romeo becomes more devoted and passionate as he moves further into his relationship with Juliet. After the wedding night, although Romeo must leave before dawn he is so consumed by true love that he tells Juliet he will risk death just to stay with her a little while longer.

Juliet wills it so. Romeo is describing how he feels in both quotes but because he is more to the point when he speaks to Juliet about how he feels.

It seems as if Romeo is hiding the fact he feels only Courtly love for Rosaline behind long elaborate wordplay and oxymorons — it implies that it is not sincere, and is quite childish in a way. One would expect that Romeo has read of noble knights speaking of their love interests in this manner, and is simply copying their style and idolising these great warriors.

However, his passion for Juliet causes him to tell her the strength of his love in a much more realistically and truthfully — from the heart, and he really seems to grow up.

Therefore when Romeo and Juliet marry, it pans out as much more like true love, than a modern audience would see. However there is still a significant contrast in courtly and true passionate love which convincingly develops the bond between Romeo and Juliet audiences of both times, and makes the tragedy of both their deaths at the end seem so much more heart wrenching and devastating.

Quick Answer

Throughout the play, Juliet also goes on her own emotional journey as she falls in love with Romeo and then defies her family to be with him. When the audience first sees Juliet, she is just a young inexperienced child of only thirteen, sitting with her nurse and mother who are both beginning to think about marriage for her.

Many directors of this play have interpreted this particular scene very differently, depending on the message they wish to give the audience. Indeed, some plays have depicted Juliet in this scene as much too young to marry; perhaps she would enter eating sweets, or playing puerile games as she listens to Lady Capulet describe a man lined up to marry her.

These particular plays tend to be of a more modern era to put across just how juvenile Juliet was at this time, because in the 16th and 17th centuries it was much more usual for a girl in her early teens to be married than it is now.

Juliet is in awe of marriage before she meets Romeo — her perception of it is a great and noble thing that she, at that point, feels too inadequate for: How stands your disposition to be married?

But no more deep will I endart mine eye Than your consent gives strength to make it fly. Here, Juliet is showing her devotion to her family — in short, her love of Lady Capulet makes Juliet want to please her — by naively doing whatever Lady Capulet wishes her to do, which is to have a young arranged marriage.

However, this aspect of the play for the modern audience is seen in a very different way, as arranged marriages are so uncommon nowadays and are often thought of as unfair and controlling of the parents. She then chooses to end her own life when she discovers he is dead.

The transformation of the immature, naive Juliet into the independent, passionate determined Juliet happens throughout the play, but with key markers such as: Her love for Romeo is creating such a strong emotion in her that she is acting assertively in a way that she would obviously never have considered before learning what love really was.

She even lies to her father about confessing and agreeing to marry Paris, which is in conflict with what her religion teaches. Friar Lawrence could be described as the source of paternal love for Juliet as he is the person who understands that she loves Romeo, and is willing to help her.

For instance, Juliet is particularly close, not to her mother, but to the nurse who has cared for her since birth, because in the s in such contrast to today it was seen as normal for an important and wealthy lady to completely wash her hands of the labours of bringing up her child.

A mother neglecting her child is rightfully seen as an unacceptable thing nowadays, and men have a much larger role in childcare. The nurse whom he and Lady Capulet employed instead would dress, clean, breastfeed and care for the baby who was not hers.

Therefore an extremely strong bond mutually exists between the nurse and the older Juliet. And I might live to see thee married once, I have my wish. Act 1, scene 3 lines After a long monologue when the Nurse explains she had another child who died before Juliet, she ends with a rude sexual joke and a compliment to Juliet with a wish for her to marry soon before the nurse dies.

Perhaps it is something to do with her social class — as she is only a servant to the Capulets she has less wealth and is also less involved in the feud between the two houses. This means that the Nurse will understand that love is most important in a marriage, not riches or status.

Lady Capulet however, married young and the wife of what some would describe as a money-obsessed, much her senior man, seems never to have known real love, therefore clouding her judgements for Juliet.

It seems as if this particular relationship was not based around love, but around lust and physical attraction, showing a further misunderstanding of Lady Capulet regarding true love and almost depicting her as a jealous child, pining for something in a marriage that she really needs.

Romeo and Juliet: True Love? | Teen Ink

When Tybalt is killed by Romeo, Lady Capulet as one of the first on the scene seems a little overly prostrate with grief:Get an answer for 'Is Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet a tale of love or infatuation?' and find homework help for other Romeo and Juliet questions at eNotes.

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In “Romeo and Juliet” Rosaline does not.

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